prodigalmomma











{October 19, 2011}   Role Model

Over the last week there’s been a reasonable amount in the press about Dr Fox MP –  I can agree with some of the sentiments expressed by him about the “hounding” of members of his family (the elderly and children allegedly) and I’m not entirely sure that the collected media has a right to sit in judgement over individuals (particularly since the phone hacking scandal) an interesting point is raised.  Those in the public eye ought to be seen as role models.

I don’t hold to the sentiment that those in politics or other ‘professionals’ are a different sort of people (it seems easy to lapse into a ‘them and us’ scenario), but precisely because they are no different to you or I they should demonstrate a kind of role model to which others might aspire.  I can’t (and I won’t) get into the details of the Dr. Fox situation, I don’t really know them, or him.  In a way though, despite being found to have broken ministerial code there is something redeemable in the character Dr Fox presents… he did something wrong, he ‘fessed up, he apologised and he took on board the consequences of his actions.

It’s hard to take the punishment or come to understand the consequences of our actions – harder still to see that sometimes those consequences stretch further than ourselves.

As part of my on-going study and training I’m undertaking an M Ed. the current module is all about becoming a ‘reflective practitioner’ (which is partly the inspiration for trying to get myself into some form of discipline over keeping a journal).  The module, from my initial readings, seems to be about personally examining events within your classroom to ask ‘why’ things happened as they did, and to discover differing possibilities of how things might roll in the future.  It also requires a degree of self-examination, asking of yourself why you responded in a certain way.  The readings (so far) suggest that we all bring our own values/attitudes/experiences/perspectives to the table when we enter the professional arena (and that’s not limited to just teaching) but just as we do the pupils/children/clients/customers/colleagues also do… some situations can result in ‘clashes’ just because we’re coming from differing perspectives.

So I’m trying to think (as part of all this) how I can learn to be a better role model in the way I express myself, explain things and respond to people (children and adults) in the workplace.

There’s been some interesting discussions of late where I work; surrounding behaviour of children and those attitudes / sentiments we unconsciously condone or support by tacitly accepting them as “well that’s real life”… I wonder if it’s ‘ok’ to use that line, to argue that point?  Hand on heart, I don’t feel that just because something ‘is’ we can always successfully argue that it ‘should be’ that way… the tough but is navigating those two frontiers – drawing from what we know, and what we are given and progressing / improving / challenging / extending into what things could be.  But all the while that striving needs to be tempered with what God says should be…  As Robbie Williams sings “I sit and talk to God, but he just laughs at my plans…”

But friends, that’s exactly who we are: children of God. And that’s only the beginning. Who knows how we’ll end up! What we know is that when Christ is openly revealed, we’ll see him—and in seeing him, become like him. All of us who look forward to his Coming stay ready, with the glistening purity of Jesus’ life as a model for our own.

[1 John 3.2]

Me, being me, I did a quick search for what the Bible may have to say about being a role model; there’s bits about being ‘models of goodness’ (Titus 2.1), we were made for ‘God-modeled love’ (1 Corinthians 6.16) and not trading God in for the latest model (2 Chronicles 13.10) but I thought 1 John just hit the nail on the head.  Again, as I read it can be challenging – we become like those we hang around with… you can sometimes see it in people who’ve been married a long time, or close friends, or even characteristics between parent and child which are not always genetics.  Makes me think, who do I choose to spend time with?  And, how much time do I make to actually ‘be’ with God?  If he’s what I say I am aiming at and for, then do I walk the talk?  The words of Steve Chalke from a Faithworks talk years ago when I was a teenager ring in my head at times like this “The words are easy… but the actions are hard.” 

I’m challenged as I read this and work on writing this, and understanding my thoughts on these matters… I need to make sure that I don’t allow these thoughts to be lost, I don’t want to run the risk of shooting these ideas into the vast emptiness of cyberspace and fail to let them fill me, fill my life and my actions.  But everything now is like a heavy beat, urging me on – and you may not believe it, but it’s a heavier beat than any I heard in my raving days…

But that, the raving days, is another story… and I should shower before The Fades comes on BBC3!

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Han says:

Well done with your second post 🙂

I didn’t know you were doing a M Ed then again I think my friend was telling me how a lot of new teachers are being encouraged to do an MA Level qualification after getting their PGCE etc.

I do agree we need to be good role models either in the sense of being Christians in this world or on our professional roles (teacher/parent for you, wife/youth workers wife) for me. With Chris getting the Fountain off the ground we’re under a spotlight in a way but that’s kinda a whole other thing.

I think you giving up smoking is also part of being a good role model and I am so proud of you taking that step to give up 🙂 I know you know what it does to your lungs etc but I think you’ll feel better overall as well.

I always liked the next line in Feel “My head speaks a language I just don’t understand.” some days I get in such a muddle I think I need an interpreter to work it out for me.



Well I did a PG Cert. in Early Years Leadership as part of my initial teacher training – which is (credit wise) worth a 3rd of an MA, so I decided to look into continuing it. Yes, there’s been encouragagement from the government anbd also fr5om within education itself to become an MA profession which is partly to do with it… but also I found that I really enjoy learning!

There’s something exciting about having to keep on your toes with topics that you’ll be teaching (I teach using a creative curriculum model) but I feel that remembering my role as ‘learner’ helps me when I’m teaching. I try to see the frustration of a child when they find something tricky to be the same as my own frustration when I’m wrestling with something in my own brain

Feel is a beautiful song, for a while as a teenager I kinda wanted to never hear it as it became ‘the song’ for my 1st boyfriend and his new girlfriend (the one after me) but time heals, and now I love it… but funny how when I hear it I’m still taken back to that time in my head. It’s as if there’s a window between myself and the event now, I can see it – but it no longer effects me as it once did.



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