prodigalmomma











{February 7, 2012}   Like a Movie…

Matthew 24:1-24

My daily reading seems to come across like a script for a Jean Claude Van Damme movie; I read it aloud to let those words sink and it almost seemed as if I should be reading it in that big booming voice as found in the trailers for action thriller films.

This is the sort of passage that I want to point to at moments when it is suggested that faith is a lovely fluffy blanket or opiate to keep ‘reality’ away.  This is reality, it’s far more disturbing than what we see on a day to day basis.  When faith and commitment are treated as an optional extra it’s a dangerous error to be making.

And… I have stood in that place.  I don’t need God.  I can stand on my own two feet.  I’ve got my friends and family around me.  It’s in those moments we need faith more than ever.

Newsboys – “I am Second”

False prophets: It seems we don’t have prophets in the biblical sense anymore, people going around in sackcloth all beardy and munching on locusts.  No, the media has taken that role – I think television has taken the role of the prophets.  The LAB comments that these false prophecies might be… “God wants you to be rich… Do whatever your desires tell you!”

Eddie Izzard in a sketch comments on the advertising industry, particularly how many items are marketed with the implicit line of “buy this and everyone will shag you” Once again it’s these false promises and false realities that perpetuate society (and people suggest I’ve got my head in the clouds as a follower of Christ!)

The consequence of buying into these false prophecies and promises is severe “Because of the increase of wickedness, the love of most will grow cold.” (Matthew 24.12) Love will grow cold.  Now whatever your beliefs, we can agree (hopefully) that love and compassion are a vital part of society.  If we lose love, what are we left with?  If we let it grow cold the world would become barren.

The remedy for this loss of love?  Now it is warned that love grows cold when our attention is on ourselves rather than others, so let’s reverse this!

One way is by writing to those persecuted for their faith, or to those in positions of power who might raise their voice for good.

Get involved by looking at Release International or write to your local councillor and MP regarding something close to my heart, cutting of funding for charities helping those who suffer domestic violence – see about the cuts here

What do you think are today’s false prophecies?  How can we guard against them?  How can we prevent the cold from rising?

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{January 31, 2012}   Blind Ambition

Matthew 20: 17-34

I confess as a parent I want the absolute best for my child; I want her to grow up and continue to have the joy for life and learning that she currently has.  I hope that she will make good choices.  I pray she will come to be in a relationship with Jesus.  I want her to be full of kindness and compassion, and to have good survival skills when she faces disappointments and set backs in life.  I hope that I, and the rest of our family & friends have provided strong roots for her, which will allow her to grow into an amazing woman.

I want all of this so badly that I can picture it in my mind.  I can see all the possibilities opening up before her… I don’t want to miss a thing!

These are my ambitions for her and I don’t see anything wrong or harmful in holding wishes for the future for our children, and our friends’ children.  But this reading from Matthew (when I read it again using the Life Application Bible) looks at exactly this area… parental ambition…

Grant that one of these two sons of mine may sit at your right and the other at your left in your kingdom. (Matthew 20:21b)

I have mixed feelings about this request; 1st feeling is she displayed absolute faith – the kingdom belongs to Jesus, she faithfully accepted Jesus’ position.  The notes in my Bible encourage me to look further at this though – what were her motivations?  Perhaps she sought glory for her sons, perhaps (though on the surface demonstrative of faith) this mother had missed the point of Jesus’ ministry.  She was blinded by her human ambition.

Jesus modelled a different kind of leadership; Jesus demonstrated servant leadership – washing the feet of his disciples (John 13:11-13), submitting to God’s will first through his baptism (Matthew 3.13) and finally ultimate submission on the cross (Matthew 26.39 and John 19) – this was leadership without seeking glory.  Jesus represents here an amazing example to us all – How best to lead people.  The example of sevant leadership can be useful to us in any field; I particularly it’s role in parenthood, in teaching, in family life – what other areas might it be useful in?

At the completion of the section; the theme of ‘blindness’ is tackled again…

Jesus stopped and called to them.  “What do you want me to do for you?” he asked.  “Lord,” they answered, “we want our sight.”(Matthew 20:32-33)

The LAB (Life Application Bible) comments on this passage…

These blind beggars could see that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah, while the religious leaders who witnesses Jesus’ miracle were blind to his identity, refusing to open their eyes to the truth.  Seeing with your eyes doesn’t guarantee you seeing with the heart.

I quoted because this section really hit me…

  • what do I / you allow get in the way of believing?  (What’s your blind spot?)
  • do I / you ever in your actions get in the way of people seeing Christ?
  • who / what do I / you submit to in life?
  • when we / I lead do I present a servant model of leadership… or an authoritarian one?

[on a side note]

I am loving getting more into the Bible and really unpacking it, and thinking as I write – this is the way I find it easiest to operate.  Sometimes I just jot ideas / thoughts and pictures down on paper and in notebooks, other times I blog it.

I blog because I had a bit of a deep think about whether or not to continue to be on social networking sites such as Twitter or Facebook (on twitter I am @prodigalmomma ) as there’s some truly negative and ‘not uplifting’ stuff out there… and to be honest I find it all-too-easy to be drawn into the sillyness etc.  but I wanted to continue putting positivity out there.

I am not an authority, or a theologian – just a follower of Christ who’s trying to navigate her way through life… and life, I’ve found through bitter experience, really does go downhill when I’m not stuck into the Word regularly.



{January 30, 2012}   Do something Beautiful…

In the same vein as it ‘never being too late’ this devotion also popped into my mailbox today (yes, I’m at home working on the M Ed. so generally clearing out my mailbox and doing deskbound stuff)

But instead of just surviving, of asking God “Please bless my plans today” (c’mon be honest, who hasn’t done that?!?!) Challenge yourself and go do something beautiful for God.

Do beautiful things for God.

Graham Kendrick sings “Do Something Beautiful”



{January 30, 2012}   Never too Late…

Matthew 20:1-16

So I’ve been doing the ‘usual thing’ for me and meandering off a little; kind of getting into the old way of thinking which – for me – is this life is short, so best get out there and live it!

Unfortunately for me (and for others who subscribe to this mode of thinking) this works out as being a selling of inheritance in order to gain a fast-food meal.  I KNOW this, so I don’t really know why I fall for the trick…

I’ve not really been following The Magicians on the BBC – but I’ve caught a couple of snatches of it; in some cases we know how the trick is done, but we’re still prepared to suspend belief and enjoy the ride.  If you watched any on “Penn & Teller: Fool Us” you’ll see that even those times they were not fooled, they could still enjoy and buy into what was going on.

Now, you can get all caught up in the anti-magic “Harry Potter is evil” tirade (interesting how no one gets up in arms over Narnia, though a wardrobe you can walk into another universe through and a painting which floods a room cannot be construed as non-magical…) but I’m not doing that here today – but these shows I think we can enjoy without any terrible misfortune befalling us… but in real-life, falling for the trickery (even when wee know how it is done, and recognise the consequences) can inflict serious consequences.

I loved getting the above p[assage from Matthew in my inbox today, it reaffirms the idea that – with God – it’s never too late.  This follows on from a weekend where my Church held a ‘covenant service’ where we shared the communion, heard passages from various parts of the scripture andexamined those promises which God has made to us – those fulfilled and those which will be fulfilled.  It shined some light on areas of my life where I don’t feel that I’ve held up my half of the promise.

There areas in all of us – where in relational terms – we betray that bond that we share with the divine…

BUT it is never too late to go back to Him, ‘to ‘fess up and to begin again

I’m re-joining the covenant… I don’t know quite where it’ll take me, but I’m sure it’s bound to be an exciting journey!



{December 5, 2011}   Savour the Moment

A friend shared on facebook a link for an art project where children’s drawings had been given to an established artist to turn into proper pieces of artwork.

Now your personal first response to my initial sentence probably offers you a good indication as to how you may feel about the rest of my blog.  If you think “wow, what a cool idea!” you may not entirely love the blog, while on-the-other-hand if you thought “what do you mean to say children’s art isn’t proper art” then your sentiments may be more closely aligned with my own.

The Monster Engine

I commented that while on the surface this sounded like an interesting project – and do please go have a look and make up your own mind – I’m concerned about what this sort of thing tacitly says to children, essentially “your pictures do not come up to my standards”.  Now please do not mistake my intention – I don’t wish to detract from this project or the incredible artwork (of all levels) contained within it – but more I want to highlight the possible ramifications and the ‘unsaid things’ of projects such as these which essentially seem to highjack things created by children.

In early years pedagogy there is a high level of importance placed on sustained shared thinking – a key outcome from a 2002 report (REPEY Report; Sirag-Blatchford et al., 2002).  This encourages practitioners to engage in high-level verbal interactions with children in order to support their on-going development.  Children’s art, or ‘mark making’ is viewed as a valuable tool at their disposal for communication…

Drawing is one of Reggio Emilia’s many languages (Malaguzzi, cited in Fillipini and Vecchi, 1997), used by children to talk about their worlds, both to themselves and to others.  Part fine motor skill development – with hand-eye coordination a key component – and part play, Athey (2007) sees drawing as a reflection of young children’s inner schematic representations.  Matthews (1999) concurs that, for younger children, mark making provides opportunity to explore the lines and curves of trajectory and enclosure schemas, for instance.  However, for older children between the ages of three and four, he views the drawing as located within a family of expressing and symbolic actions [which they] use fluently.  He goes on to describe the interpersonal arena between caregiver and infant that is core to young children’s drawings.  Early years practitioners, thus, should take children’s mark making seriously and look for opportunities to interact with children about their drawings.  However, caution is urged in over-analysing children’s without any reference to the child’s own narrative, and Ring’s research (2001) shows how, all too frequently, the role of drawing in children’s learning is misunderstood.  Emphasizing the interrelational aspect of drawing, Ring (2001) urges practitioners to explore the relationship between drawing as communication and drawing as art. [Supporting Pedagogy and Practice in Early Years Settings; Allen and Whalley; 2010:107]

When you explore child development, and see the stages – particularly with reference to fine motor skills which are required for drawing – you start to admire these drawings as ends in themselves.  Failing to appreciate each moment risks viewing human development (I extend it here as I feel that we all change and develop throughout our lives) as a conveyor belt towards death.

“Rising Five”

Norman Nicholson explores this very idea (I studied the poem at GCSE I think, and was reminded of it through thinking on this topic)

I want to celebrate each achievement in a life, not see it as a step towards the grave.  It is exciting when my daughter draws a picture; she’s recently started to include finer details such as arms and legs to pictures of those she knows and that’s really cool.  I don’t look at a drawing she hands me, and tells me about the bits she has included then turn to her and say “oh darling maybe next time include fingers!”  No I say, “wow, your Uncle will be so touched you drew a picture of him, what a kind idea, I love the different colours you’ve used.”

There’s a lot of issues today which seem to centre around worth, value and self-esteem; eating disorders; depression; anxiety; stress; addictions; abuse… I could (sadly) list far more.  We have to show people they are valued.  We need to encourage and challenge one another to treat people according to the value that God places on each and every one of us.

I’ve been away recently, meeting with those who try to live by Jesus principles, I was challenged and humbled by much of what I heard.  I also feel really uplifted by hearing peoples stories, being blessed by others sharing some of their daily lives and talking about what people of faith, followers of Christ, are doing in various countries across Europe and further afield in Africa and the USA.

One exciting thing for me personally to have come out of this weekend was a renewed sense that I’m in the right place.  I feel I’ve been encouraged in my work with young children and I’m excited how things may progress over the next few years.  I’m inspired by something I heard, and didn’t really fully comprehend at the time, during my teacher training that I should look to become an ambassador for children and young people… and that’s what I’m going to put my heart into.



{October 31, 2011}   Church is Irrelevant (so says us)

In his article Dean Seddon asserts that that contemporary society has branded the Church as irrelevant, and (as sad as I am to say it) I believe that he’s right.  I’d take the assertion a step further and argue that not only does society brand the Church as irrelevant, but it also labels it as a hindrance, something which holds us back (at the best) and as something which hides from humanity the darker elements of itself (here I think of the sad cases of child abuse within the Church and conspiracy theories such as were popularised in the Dan Brown books).

** interestingly the Dan Brown books are still on my ‘to be read’ list of books, I’ve seen the first movie but not read the books as yet **

Society may be a rebellious child shouting at ‘the Church’ and straining at the leash to be free.  “You stop our fun!  You hate sex!  You hate gays!  You hate women!”

Society believed it had killed God many years ago, and now it’s trying to stamp on the grave…

 

Do you ever have a quiet giggle to yourself over the danger of this strategy?  It is a little like poking the sleeping lion (or perhaps the sleeping mummy after you’ve kept waking her up every 40 minutes overnight!)

God isn’t dead…

And God is watching!

 

I remember a rather long but amusing joke I heard a few years ago…

There’s this burglar who breaks into a warehouse one night.  The burglar’s made a plan, he knows when the night watchman has his break, knows where the cameras are… all those shenanigans. 

So he’s padding gently about, looking for things to steal and sell on.  Then he here’s this voice, “Jesus is watching you!”  The thief turns round, but there’s nobody there, so he continues and a few minutes later he hears it again, “Jesus is WATCHING you!”

The burglar’s getting more than a little twitchy now and wonders whether he should get out of the place right then and there.  He hears the voice again, “Jesus is watching you!” and he begins to suspect someone is winding him up, so he replies “who are you?  Where are you?”

“Behind you, over here!” The burglar strains to see where the voice is coming from, he certainly hasn’t heard anyone else come into the building.  “Who are you?” he asks, to which he hears a reply close to his left ear “Moses!”  The thief whirls round to see a parrot on a perch in the darkness.  He chuckles to himself and says “that’s an odd name for a parrot!”

The parrot responds, “not as funny as ‘Jesus’ is for a rottweiller!”

 

Perhaps the question to ask of society’s attempt to brand the Church as irrelevant poses some important questions…

  • Who / what do they believe the Church to be?

I personally see the Church far more as a group of people, a family – Church provides me with love, support, guidance, friendship, fun among many other things.  “Church” to me is no more the building or an institution any more than a school is the building.  One of the oddest experiences as a new teacher is to be in school at the start of a year; there are no pictures on the wall, no displays of work, chatter of children… the atmosphere is entirely different.  Creating a good and positive learning environment is one of those things I constantly work towards – and I view the Church in a similar way.  Church is the smile from the welcoming team, the chat while getting tea & squash, making plans for Christmas, charity (we’re supporting the Christmas Child shoebox thing), thinking ahead to the summer.  Church is praying for those we care about, for those ‘in the Church’ and outside the Church… Church is so many things which cannot be contained in a negative newspaper article!

No one abuses his own body, does he? No, he feeds and pampers it. That’s how Christ treats us, the church, since we are part of his body. And this is why a man leaves father and mother and cherishes his wife. No longer two, they become “one flesh.” This is a huge mystery, and I don’t pretend to understand it all. What is clearest to me is the way Christ treats the church. And this provides a good picture of how each husband is to treat his wife, loving himself in loving her, and how each wife is to honour her husband. [Ephesians 5.29]

  • Why do they want Church to be irrelevant

Things which are branded ‘irrelevant’ are not considered important.  The rain pouring down is irrelevant in my decision to go to work, it’s not important enough to stop me… that’s compared with perhaps my daughter being poorly and needing alternative childcare or a trip to the doctor.

Society wants Church branded irrelevant because then they can ignore it, they can ignore what Jesus did (WWJD is just some cheesy Christian wristband isn’t it?), they can demote God to a swear word.

There should be a consistency that runs through us all. For Jesus doesn’t change—yesterday, today, tomorrow, he’s always totally himself. [Hebrews 18:8]

God, and Jesus and faith and all that – well that’s something to turn to when you’ve had your fun.  When you’re old, and about to die.  It’s not relevant to today – the Bible was written all those years ago!

“Up on your feet! Take a deep breath! Maybe there’s life in you yet. But I wouldn’t know it by looking at your busywork; nothing of God’s work has been completed. Your condition is desperate. Think of the gift you once had in your hands, the Message you heard with your ears—grasp it again and turn back to God. “If you pull the covers back over your head and sleep on, oblivious to God, I’ll return when you least expect it, break into your life like a thief in the night. [Revelation 3:2]

Today I think I’ll take some time out in the evening, against the backdrop of All Hallows Eve to pray for those who don’t yet recognise Jesus in their lives… because it is a matter of life or death.



{October 30, 2011}   Moving on (1st look at apologies)

The beautifully illustrated and written book “Zen Shorts” by Jon J Muth features a story about carrying a burden…

Two traveling monks reached a town where there was a young woman waiting to step out of her sedan chair. The rains had made deep puddles and she couldn’t step across without spoiling her silken robes. She stood there, looking very cross and impatient. She was scolding her attendants. They had nowhere to place the packages they held for her, so they couldn’t help her across the puddle.

The younger monk noticed the woman, said nothing, and walked by. The older monk quickly picked her up and put her on his back, transported her across the water, and put her down on the other side. She didn’t thank the older monk, she just shoved him out of the way and departed.

As they continued on their way, the young monk was brooding and preoccupied. After several hours, unable to hold his silence, he spoke out. “That woman back there was very selfish and rude, but you picked her up on your back and carried her! Then she didn’t even thank you!”

“I set the woman down hours ago,” the older monk replied. “Why are you still carrying her?”

Although zen readings are (I believe) linked to Buddhist beliefs, nevertheless I feel that other spiritual writing can be of interest in any spiritually aware life – irregardless of the personal beliefs you hold.

I think we can find biblical parallels with this story of setting down a load permanently; first I think of the story of the adulterous woman (John 8v1-11).  Things I notice about this bit

  • Lots of people were ready to accuse & condemn this woman

Jesus had been at the Mount of Olives but he returned to teach in the Temple and “Swarms of people came to him”.  Can you imagine this bustling busy 1st century temple, how busy it would have been?  Jewish law maintained that regular sacrifices had to be made in the temple, sometimes on a daily basis so there was no way this would have been a quite contemplative place.  So, in full view of everyone the religious leaders pull in this accused woman, announcing her misdeeds.

  • Jesus was wholly righteous, he could have condemned this woman…

…but he didn’t!  He asked if someone, anyone, could come forward and say “I’ve not messed up at all”, he invited the person who could say that to condemn this woman.  The only one who could, in good faith, accuse and condemned the adulterous woman (whom the religious leaders claim was caught red-handed) was Jesus.

  • The only one who can accuse and condemn us is Jesus…

…but he doesn’t!  Now I’ve spent a decent percentage of my young adult life effectively feeling fairly guilty for some of the poor choices I’ve made, and the paths I’ve walked down so this one is a bitter pill for me to swallow.  I want to argue back at it, ‘but Lord, Father, you can’t mean me!  But what about…’  I can see him saying ‘yeah, I know about that… and that…but it is finished’  There’s something me that sometimes still wants to argue … but as I try to get deeper wrestling with God’s word I’m trying to more and more let the truth of tetelestai sink in.

  • We are forgiven, but we need to stop doing what we did before.

It’s been said before, but repentance, saying sorry to God means a complete turning around.  Now, moment of personal honesty here, I’m an ex-smoker… ex for just under a month and I’ve tried quitting before so I’m not hanging up any banners about it just yet.  But, it was as if smoking was the thing from my ‘old life’ I was keeping back for me.  As if I was saying ‘okay God, I’ll go more regularly to Church because I like the worship and it’s good for my daughter, I’ll stop the children in my class saying omg [this is still a work in progress] and I’ll live my life for you… but I’ll do it with a cigarette in my hand.’

That’s not really how repentance, and being a ‘prodigal’ works now is it?

Saying sorry means the actions as well as the words; I try to impress this on children whom I teach.  Saying sorry for talking over the teacher means very little if they continue to do so.  Likewise, apologising to another child for not letting them join in the game whilst continuing to ignore them in the playground does not work.  I try to do this with my own daughter, who knows the word ‘sorry’ and usually knows when it’s appropriate to say it (and can be quicker to apologise than her own mummy!) but this doesn’t always mean the behaviour she apologises for stops (she’s only 4 so she’s learning all this).

As I try to educate children, my own and those I am responsible for I need to remember in my own life that apology without actions is just paying lip service to social conventions… and that’s the kind of ‘ritual’ I think really sticks in the divine throat… he looks at the heart and wants meaning.

1 Samuel 16:7
But God told Samuel, “Looks aren’t everything. Don’t be impressed with his looks and stature. I’ve already eliminated him. God judges persons differently than humans do. Men and women look at the face; God looks into the heart.”



Today’s Bible Reflection for women from BibleGateway landed in my inbox (you can read it here).  It really struck me, firstly because it once again burst that bubble that I sometimes find myself in the I’m the only one who thinks like this bubble (it’s not far away from the teenage bubble I had of It’s all about me!)

I have made poor decisions in the past.  I have experienced situations that I wish I had not.  But, I don’t generally have regrets… everything I have done / experienced has affected the person who I am today.  As I read about being a ‘reflective practitioner’ as part of my M Ed. I become more aware of possible causes/factors in the person I am today.

But I think I’ve become sometimes too stuck in the negative thought cycle of “I am what others have made me” at times without truly considering either …

  • my active role in who I am (the past, present and for the future)
  • whose image I am created in (and whose likeness I aspire to imitate)
  • what has been done for me (and what the appropriate response to that event may be)

I identify at ties with the woman in this reflection, the contradiction between wanting to just curl up with your child and be in love with them, and not quite at times feeling worthy of such a precious gift…

But who declares me ‘unworthy’?

What does God say about me?  I just found these Bible Affirmations and I think I may well have to find out some way to put them up in my room so that I can think about a different one every day, or a different one every week.  Actually the GP recommends that I devise a form of ‘positive mental toolbox’ to help myself in low moments, perhaps these affirmations would / could be a good part of that?

Back before Easter this year I had a tattoo done.  Not my 1st, and I know that Christian opinion is split on them, but I think God is love and gave humanity a gift for creativity… but that’s my opinion.  The tattoo is ancient Greek, tetelestai meaning “it is finished” or “paid in full”… the final words of Jesus on the cross.  Perhaps this is something I need to absorb deeper than skin deep when I doubt and accuse myself, I need to remember that things are no longer hanging over my head…

…but that’s not a 1-way process, the next big thought is how do I honestly respond to such a gift?  I guess it’s something I’ll spend the rest of my life doing.

But biblical mantras / affirmations … are they a good & useful thing to get into?  Or do we risk inventing another ritual without much meaning or heart?  Because from the gospels I think Jesus wasn’t a great fan of that whole thing.  Hmmm something to think about!

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{October 27, 2011}   Creative prejudice

I was made aware of this article by my good friends at the Heritage Arts Company, they posted this article regarding Vimeo’s latest ruling on computer gaming.  I thought it was quite an interesting read, and the argument put forward in an eloquent and articulate manner.  But do have a read and see what you think.

My discussionHere’s my brief discussion/rant on the issue – admittedly I know little about the video gaming world, you will see that I describe myself as a ‘lay person’ in this arena.  But what I’ve noticed in young children is no joke.  When asking children to describe events over the summer holidays many seemed incapable of moving beyond the essential and basic facts.

I’m not alone in commenting on this colleagues working in early years have noted that the children struggle to devise games and activities of their own volition.  They appear at times to be unable to use their initiative.

If video killed the radio star… does the computer game kill imagination?

Surely this is a scary prospect when we live in a rapidly changing world.  As a teacher I know that I am effectively preparing the children whom I teach for jobs, careers and professions which simply do not currently exist.  If we flick through job adverts and descriptions employers rarely seek (or claim to seek) employees who might work as automotons (no, robots have already claimed those variety of jobs) but people capable of using their initiative, meet needs before they are recognised and to work without direct supervision.

So how are computer games, DS’s, brain training software equipping our children and ourselves for the future?  Are they an addition or a detraction?  Do we return to the dilemma of “because something is then we may argue that it should be“.

And one of the thought-provoking conversations I had with a child regarding a long car drive over the holday…

Me:       Ooh, that’s a long way in the car… did you see lots of interesting things on the way?

Child:   I don’t know… I was watching a dvd.

Sci-fi tells of a fantasy world where machines have the upper hand, it never mentions how we turn our own children into them…



{October 19, 2011}   Role Model

Over the last week there’s been a reasonable amount in the press about Dr Fox MP –  I can agree with some of the sentiments expressed by him about the “hounding” of members of his family (the elderly and children allegedly) and I’m not entirely sure that the collected media has a right to sit in judgement over individuals (particularly since the phone hacking scandal) an interesting point is raised.  Those in the public eye ought to be seen as role models.

I don’t hold to the sentiment that those in politics or other ‘professionals’ are a different sort of people (it seems easy to lapse into a ‘them and us’ scenario), but precisely because they are no different to you or I they should demonstrate a kind of role model to which others might aspire.  I can’t (and I won’t) get into the details of the Dr. Fox situation, I don’t really know them, or him.  In a way though, despite being found to have broken ministerial code there is something redeemable in the character Dr Fox presents… he did something wrong, he ‘fessed up, he apologised and he took on board the consequences of his actions.

It’s hard to take the punishment or come to understand the consequences of our actions – harder still to see that sometimes those consequences stretch further than ourselves.

As part of my on-going study and training I’m undertaking an M Ed. the current module is all about becoming a ‘reflective practitioner’ (which is partly the inspiration for trying to get myself into some form of discipline over keeping a journal).  The module, from my initial readings, seems to be about personally examining events within your classroom to ask ‘why’ things happened as they did, and to discover differing possibilities of how things might roll in the future.  It also requires a degree of self-examination, asking of yourself why you responded in a certain way.  The readings (so far) suggest that we all bring our own values/attitudes/experiences/perspectives to the table when we enter the professional arena (and that’s not limited to just teaching) but just as we do the pupils/children/clients/customers/colleagues also do… some situations can result in ‘clashes’ just because we’re coming from differing perspectives.

So I’m trying to think (as part of all this) how I can learn to be a better role model in the way I express myself, explain things and respond to people (children and adults) in the workplace.

There’s been some interesting discussions of late where I work; surrounding behaviour of children and those attitudes / sentiments we unconsciously condone or support by tacitly accepting them as “well that’s real life”… I wonder if it’s ‘ok’ to use that line, to argue that point?  Hand on heart, I don’t feel that just because something ‘is’ we can always successfully argue that it ‘should be’ that way… the tough but is navigating those two frontiers – drawing from what we know, and what we are given and progressing / improving / challenging / extending into what things could be.  But all the while that striving needs to be tempered with what God says should be…  As Robbie Williams sings “I sit and talk to God, but he just laughs at my plans…”

But friends, that’s exactly who we are: children of God. And that’s only the beginning. Who knows how we’ll end up! What we know is that when Christ is openly revealed, we’ll see him—and in seeing him, become like him. All of us who look forward to his Coming stay ready, with the glistening purity of Jesus’ life as a model for our own.

[1 John 3.2]

Me, being me, I did a quick search for what the Bible may have to say about being a role model; there’s bits about being ‘models of goodness’ (Titus 2.1), we were made for ‘God-modeled love’ (1 Corinthians 6.16) and not trading God in for the latest model (2 Chronicles 13.10) but I thought 1 John just hit the nail on the head.  Again, as I read it can be challenging – we become like those we hang around with… you can sometimes see it in people who’ve been married a long time, or close friends, or even characteristics between parent and child which are not always genetics.  Makes me think, who do I choose to spend time with?  And, how much time do I make to actually ‘be’ with God?  If he’s what I say I am aiming at and for, then do I walk the talk?  The words of Steve Chalke from a Faithworks talk years ago when I was a teenager ring in my head at times like this “The words are easy… but the actions are hard.” 

I’m challenged as I read this and work on writing this, and understanding my thoughts on these matters… I need to make sure that I don’t allow these thoughts to be lost, I don’t want to run the risk of shooting these ideas into the vast emptiness of cyberspace and fail to let them fill me, fill my life and my actions.  But everything now is like a heavy beat, urging me on – and you may not believe it, but it’s a heavier beat than any I heard in my raving days…

But that, the raving days, is another story… and I should shower before The Fades comes on BBC3!



et cetera